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Frequently Ask Question (FAQ) 

1.0 What is the different between Laminate Flooring, Vinyl Flooring and Spc flooring?  

Laminate flooring, SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) flooring, and vinyl flooring are all popular options for residential and commercial spaces, but they have several key differences. Here's a comparison of these three types of flooring:

1. Material Composition:

  • Laminate Flooring: Laminate flooring consists of multiple layers, including a wear layer (transparent top layer), a printed or decorative layer (which mimics the look of wood or other materials), a high-density fiberboard (HDF) core layer, and a backing layer. Laminate flooring is not made of real wood but replicates its appearance.

  • SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) Flooring: SPC flooring is composed of a dense core layer made from a mixture of natural limestone powder, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and stabilizers. It also includes a wear layer, a printed design layer, and an underlayment layer in some products.

  • Vinyl Flooring: Vinyl flooring is made primarily from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and other additives. It features several layers, including a wear layer, a printed or decorative layer, a core layer (which may vary in composition depending on the type of vinyl flooring), and a backing layer.

2. Durability and Water Resistance:

  • Laminate Flooring: Laminate is durable and can withstand moderate wear and tear, but it is not as water-resistant as SPC or vinyl flooring. Prolonged exposure to moisture can cause the HDF core to swell and warp.

  • SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) Flooring: SPC flooring is highly durable and extremely water-resistant. It can handle moisture without warping or damage, making it suitable for areas prone to water exposure.

  • Vinyl Flooring: Vinyl flooring is also durable and highly water-resistant. It is known for its ability to resist moisture and is often used in wet areas like bathrooms and kitchens.

3. Appearance and Design Options:

  • Laminate Flooring: Laminate flooring offers a wide range of design options, including wood, stone, and tile patterns. The quality of the printing technology used in laminate flooring has improved, allowing for realistic appearances.

  • SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) Flooring: SPC flooring comes in various styles and designs, including wood and stone patterns. Like laminate, it can also replicate the look of natural materials effectively.

  • Vinyl Flooring: Vinyl flooring is known for its versatility in design. It offers an extensive selection of colors, patterns, and styles, including wood, stone, tile, and unique designs. The visual layer is typically very realistic.

4. Installation:

  • Laminate Flooring: Laminate flooring is often installed as a floating floor, with interlocking planks that are not glued or nailed down. It's a popular choice for DIY installation.

  • SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) Flooring: SPC flooring typically uses a click-and-lock installation system, which is also suitable for DIY projects. Some types may require glue-down installation.

  • Vinyl Flooring: Vinyl flooring can be installed using various methods, including glue-down, peel-and-stick, and click-and-lock. The installation method depends on the specific type of vinyl flooring chosen.

5. Cost:

  • Laminate Flooring: Generally, laminate flooring is moderately priced, making it a budget-friendly option for many homeowners.

  • SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) Flooring: SPC flooring is typically in a similar price range to laminate flooring, offering good value for its durability and water resistance.

  • Vinyl Flooring: Vinyl flooring can range from budget-friendly options to more high-end choices, depending on the quality and design. It offers a wide price range to accommodate various budgets.

Laminate flooring, SPC (Stone Plastic Composite) flooring, and vinyl flooring are all popular options for residential and commercial spaces, but they have several key differences. Here's a comparison of these three types of flooring:

2.0 Important Notice Regarding Flooring Warranty Exclusions  

2.1 

Please note that the warranty for your flooring, while comprehensive in many aspects, does not cover damages caused by underlying leaks or moisture. Should any leakage or moisture be detected underneath the flooring, it’s important to address this promptly to prevent potential damage that might not be covered under the warranty.

Our priority is to ensure your complete satisfaction and to provide transparency regarding the coverage. We highly recommend regular checks for any underlying leaks to safeguard the integrity of your flooring and prevent potential issues.

2.2 

Please be aware that the warranty for your flooring excludes coverage for damages resulting from an uneven subfloor that has not been appropriately leveled using a self-leveling compound during the installation process. A flat and well-prepared subfloor is essential to ensure the longevity and performance of your flooring.

To maintain the validity of your warranty, it's imperative to ensure that the subfloor meets the necessary standards before installation, including the application of a self-leveling compound if required.

2.3
In the case of any defects discovered in your flooring, it’s imperative to inform us promptly. To ensure the best service and coverage under the warranty, we request that any defects found are reported to us within a maximum of two months from their initial identification. This proactive communication allows us to address any issues swiftly and effectively.

Any delay beyond this two-month window might affect the coverage under the warranty. Timely reporting of defects is crucial to expedite solutions and maintain the integrity of the warranty terms.

2.4

Please note that under the warranty terms, a claim can be made only once per invoice for flooring installation. Continuous damages or repeated issues may result in the flooring material being deemed unsuitable for further installation, using the same material.

We understand the significance of maintaining the quality and integrity of the flooring and the subsequent installations. Continuous damages might indicate potential unsuitability of the current flooring material for further installation.

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